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THE CITY REBORN FROM THE ASHES OF AMERICA'S MOST DISASTROUS FOREST FIRE
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Country Cousin

Happy Birthday George!...

The skies were clear on Friday night for the full moon and the lunar eclipse that came with it. We aren't usually that fortunate, but it was a bit chilly to spend much time outside watching it.

All in all, except for the wickedy ice, February has been quite tolerable, but it is still February. Recall one year, many, many moons ago (probably in about 1963), that temperatures never got above zero for the entire month, including in the daytime. Now that was a year to complain about! And that was in Appleton, which generally has slightly warmer weather than we get north of the meridian.

PRESIDENT'S DAY

On Monday, Feb. 20, we officially celebrate President's Day, which is a Federal holiday that several years ago replaced holidays honoring the birthdays of our two greatest presidents with one honoring all presidents, good and bad. That's kind of sad. Guess we still need to honor the office, and for the most part, even the bad presidents haven't managed to do a lot of harm. For that, we can thank the wise Founding Fathers who set up our Constituition with a separation of powers that limits the authority of each branch.

In case you don't recall, Abraham Lincoln's birthday was Sunday, Feb. 12, and Washington's birthday is on Wednesday, Feb. 22.

WHY "PRESIDENT"?

Congress under the Constitution formally convened for the first time on March 4, 1789 in New York City and George Washington was sworn in on April 30, 1789 at Federal Hall on Wall Street as the first president of the United States of America. There had been attempts to make George Washington king, but he was opposed to that idea. There had previously been presidents of Congress, but we're not talking about them.

Even the title "president" was controversial back in the day when our nation was being formed. There had never been anything like it before. How would you identify a head of state who was neither a king nor an emperor?

John Adams, as the newly-installed presiding officer of the new Senate in April of 1789 struggled to replace the title "president." He argued that the top official in the United States of America should use a more dignified and majestic term than one used for the heads of "fire companies and a cricket club." In Colonial days "president" was indeed the term commonly used for the leader of cricket clubs.

James Madison and the House and especially Senator William Maclay of Pennsylvania considered "president" a more republican term than some of Adams' suggestions, and rejected his attempts at quasi-monarchical and self-important titles. Washington himself tended to refer to his office as "chief magistrate."

By the way, Washington, DC was not the seat of government for the United States of America until after Washington was out of office.

For the first 16 months after Washington's inauguration, the nation's government was located in New York City, which at the time had 33,000 residents and was the second largest city in the new nation.

For that first 16 months, the Washington household, including seven slaves from Mount Vernon, lived in the Samuel Osgood House at the corner of Pearl and Cherry Streets in Manhattan.

Then on July 10, 1790, Congress voted to permanently locate the national capital in the newly designated District of Columbia, on the Potomac River, and to temporarily place the capital in Philadelphia.

That agreement was part of a compromise arranged by Alexander Hamilton in which the federal government assumed all of the states' debts accrued during the Revolution.

While the new city in the District of Columbia that we know today as Washington, DC was under construction, Philadelphia, then the largest city in North America with a population of 42,000, served as the nation's capital. When the national headquarters were in Philadelphia, the Washington family lived in a mansion at 6th and Market Streets, attended to by nine slaves from Mount Vernon. At the end of his second term in 1797, Washington returned to his beloved Mount Vernon, where he died two years later. Finally in December 1800, the federal government of the United States relocated to its permanent home, which remains our nation's capital.

Incidentally, Boston, which many of us long considered perhaps the main American city in Revolutionary days, had fewer residents than either Philadelphia or New York City in 1789 - only 24,937 in 1800. Couldn't find the head count for 1789. However, that population exploded in the first century of the United States of America as a nation. The Boston directory included 1,474 listings in 1789. By 1875 that number had ballooned to 126,769. Talk about immigration!

That said, we need to thank George Washington and the brilliant team that worked with him to lay the groundwork for the nation we have today. And we should pray to God that we're smart enough to keep this a great nation, where we can each benefit from the fruits of our own labors, or suffer under the weight of our own folly. That's what freedom is all about.

ON THE SOAP BOX

QUICK ACTION


The new Republican-controlled Congress has only been in session for six weeks, but they have been busy. Hats off to brand-new District 8 Congressman Mike Gallagher for voting recently for two bills that eliminate burdensome rules and regulations issued by federal agencies, and to the other Representatives in the house for passing them. Now let's hope the Senate does the same. Once passed, there's no doubt that brand new President Donald Trump will sign them.

For decades, industrial leaders have been begging our government bureaucracies to quit putting up unnecessary roadblocks to economic growth. This includes a permitting system that takes way, way too long to get things done.

Rep. Gallagher said when in Marinette on Monday, Feb. 6: "We passed the REINS Act to bring some order to an out of control bureaucracy, hold government accountable, and return power back to the American people. With tonight's passage of H.J. Res. 38 and H.J. Res. 31, we have made further strides in scaling back an Obama-era mindset of regulating our economy to death. Our votes help eliminate recent red tape that suffocates small businesses, destroys jobs, and indirectly places further economic burdens onto families in Northeast Wisconsin. These bills play an important step in unleashing our country's economic potential, especially for our largely untapped energy sector. Promoting economic growth remains one of my top priorities in Congress, and I look forward to continue working to provide transparency and regulatory relief for taxpayers in Northeast Wisconsin."

Couldn't agree more with what our new legislators in Washington are trying to do!

President Donald Trump during his first three weeks in office has been busy and has managed to get things done despite attempts by the liberal left to stonewall everything he tries to do.

He's been keeping his campaign promises. He has been drafting a plan to defeat ISIS, instituted the controversial ban on travelers from Muslim nations, declared a 5-year lobbying ban, and set up task forces to fight drug cartels, reduce violent crime and stop attacks against police.

He has nominated a cabinet list that meets the Conservative criteria, and has had several of his nominees confirmed.

Political pundits note if the going gets too tough, nominees often withdraw, but the Senate hasn't formally rejected a Cabinet pick since it voted down President George H.W. Bush's nomination of John Tower for defense secretary in 1989. However, no new president has gotten all nominees confirmed in the last 30 years; those that get embroiled in controversy or partisan brinkmanship (often both) usually withdraw before a vote.

LET'S CELEBRATE

Watch the newspaper, bulletin boards and web sites for things going on in your area. February isn't all bad.

That said, Valentine's Day is over, and Easter is still a long way off, so let's find other excuses to celebrate. For example, George Washington's Birthday (on Feb. 20 or 22, depending on how you look at it) calls for some type of cherry treat, even though historians claim he never did chop down that cherry tree. They say a teacher (Parson Mason Weems )made the story up in 1806 to demonstrate the value of honesty. Okay. What about the honesty of that, considering that the story was now presented as fiction, but was a made-up tale about a real person?

COOKIN' TIME

A special well wisher brought Valentine's Day cupcakes to share at the office on Tuesday. Chocolate cupcakes, each with a nice whole fresh strawberry hidden in the center, under the frosting. What a pleasant surprise! What a great idea! Cooking can be like that - try something new, and if it works, you'll be doing it forever after! So experiment. Get brave. Have fun. Maybe you can even get the family eat your mistakes!

CROCK POT STUFFED CABBAGE

This isn"t totally an economy meal but it comes pretty close. Cabbage is a vastly under used vegetable, very healthy and very inexpensive. This isn't the stuffed cabbage rolls we're used to, but is very good. Sounds like work at first glance, but requires very little kitchen time for an impressive and satisfying meal. You serve it over boiled wide noodles, so prepare for those too. As an alternative, if there's room in your crock pot, tuck a few peeled potato halves into the bottom of the slow cooker before you abandon it for the day. Sprinkle on a bit of extra salt and pepper. Carrots and onions are good too, and then you have a sort of stuffed cabbage boiled dinner. If you do that you may not want to even make the sauce. It's good both ways.

1 head cabbage

1 can beef broth or 2 cups prepared beef bouillion

Stuffing:

2 tablespoons butter1 onion, diced

1/2 pound bulk pork sausage

1/2 pound hamburger

1 egg

1 cup bread crumbs

1 tablespoon dried parsley

1 teaspoon garlic salt

1/4 teaspoon pepper

Sauce:

1/2 pint sour cream

2 tablespoons tomato paste

garlic salt and black pepper to taste

Cut the center out of the cabbage head and save it for tomorrow's cole slaw. You don't have to be fancy about the cut, just make room for the stuffing. Maybe do this part the night before to save time in the morning. In frying pan brown the onion in the butter until the onion is translucent and tender. Put the rest of the stuffing ingredients in a bowl, add add the fried onions and mix well. Pack the meat mixture into the cabbage head, trying to stuff a bit of the stuffing mixture into openings between the leaves as well. Set the whole thing in the slow cooker. Pour the broth or bouillion around the outside of the cabbage. Cover and cook at low all day, 6 to 8 hours. About 15 minutes before serving time boil wide noodles, remove cabbage from the crock and mix sauce ingredients in a saucepan. Heat but do not boil. (Sour Cream will curdle if it boils.) Serve with buttered noodles (or mashed potatoes) and pass sauce to pour over all.

CRESCENT WRAPPED CHICKEN PARMESAN

This recipe comes from friend and co-worker Lynette, who is a great cook and really, really good at finding new recipes. She said her family loved it.

8 uncooked chicken breasts or tenderloins (about 1 1/4 lbs.)

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon pepper

3 tablespoons butter

2 ounces mozzarella cheese (or more)

1 can (8 ounces) refrigerated crescent dinner rolls

3 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese

1 cup marinara sauce

Spray cookie sheet with cooking spray; set aside. Season chicken with salt and pepper (you may want more or less than the measurements specified) and divide into eight pieces. In a 10-inch nonstick skillet, melt 2 tablespoons of the butter over medium-high heat; cook chicken in butter 8 to 10 minutes or until well browned on all sides. Remove from skillet; cool slightly. Heat oven to 375 degrees. Cut mozzarella cheese into 8 pieces; cut small slits in side of each chicken tenderloin, and insert a piece of cheese in each. Unroll dough; separate into 8 triangles. Place a piece of chicken on wide end of triangle; roll dough around chicken, and place on cookie sheet. Repeat for remaining dough and chicken. In small microwavable cup, microwave remaining 1 tablespoon butter uncovered on High 15 to 30 seconds or until melted. Brush crescents with melted butter; top each with about 1 teaspoon Parmesan cheese. If desired, you can also top with about a tablespoon of Italian Panko bread crumbs before baking. Bake 14 to 18 minutes or until golden brown. In microwavable measuring cup, heat marinara sauce covered on medium-high (70%) for 1 to 2 minutes or until heated through. Serve crescents with heated marinara sauce, and pass additional grated or shredded Parmesan cheese if you like.

TRADITIONAL WASHINGTON CAKE

Legend has it that this is very close to the special cake that tradition says was served at George Washington's Mount Vernon, and was later prepared and served each year in New York City in honor of his birthday by Mary Simpson, who is said to have been one of the slaves he had freed when he moved to Philadelphia. She is said to have served the cake with coffee or tea at no charge to whoever came to help celebrate the birthday of her much-loved former master. Cherries have nothing to do with this cake, unless you were to use cherry brandy or cherry wine. You could decorate the top with candied cherries if you like. Recipe makes 9-12 servings. Bake in one 9X5-inch loaf, a 9-inch springform round, 9-inch tube cake, or four 5- by 3-inch loaf pans.

2 cups sifted cake flour, or 1 2/3 cups all-purpose flour, sifted

1 teaspoon baking powder

1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/2 teaspoon ground cloves (optional)

1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 cup unsalted butter, softened

1 1/3 cups granulated sugar, or 2/3 cup granulated sugar and 2/3 cup packed light brown sugar

4 large eggs, lightly beaten

1/4 cup heavy cream or milk

2 tablespoons brandy or sweet wine (such as Port)

2 tsp vanilla extract

1 1/2 cups coarsely chopped raisins

1 1/2 cups dried currants (8 ounces)

Position a rack in the center of the oven. Preheat the oven to 325 degrees. Grease baking pan or pans, line the bottom and sides with parchment paper, and grease again. (A spitz of cooking spray works just fine.) Sift together the flour, baking powder, spices, and salt. In a large bowl, beat the butter on low speed until smooth, about 2 minutes. Increase the speed to medium, gradually add the sugar, and beat until light and fluffy, about 4 minutes. Gradually add the eggs, beating well after each addition. Total time for beating in the eggs is about 4 minutes. In three additions fold in the flour mixture, then stir in the currants and raisins. Pour into the prepared pan, smoothing the top. Bake until a tester inserted in the center comes out clean, about 1 hours for a large loaf pan or springform pan; 1 hour and 5 minutes for a tube pan; or 40 minutes for the small loaf pans.

Let cool in the pan for 10 minutes, then remove the cake to a wire rack and let cool completely, at least 1 hours. Wrap tightly in plastic, then foil. Store at room temperature for up to 5 days or in the freezer for up to 2 months. Use a serrated knife to cut the cake into slices.

VARIATIONS:

Double the recipe and bake in a 10- by 4-inch (16-cup) tube or Bundt pan for about 11/2 hours. For a spicier cake, omit the fruit and cloves, and increase the nutmeg to 2 teaspoons and cinnamon to 11/2 teaspoons. Leave out the raisins and/or currants completely, or substitute craisins or dried cherries for the other fruits. Not sure, but think candied cherries would work in this too.

The Country Cousin



Thought for the week:
President George Washington often warned about the dangers of big government, and the danger that men can be corrupted. Here are two of his thoughts on the subject. we need to heed them today. "In politics as in philosophy, my tenets are few and simple. The leading one of which, and indeed that which embraces most others, is to be honest and just ourselves and to exact it from others, meddling as little as possible in their affairs where our own are not involved. If this maxim was generally adopted, wars would cease and our swords would soon be converted into reap hooks and our harvests be more peaceful, abundant, and happy." He also spoke often of the importance of honesty and integrity, and advised, "Labor to keep alive in your breast that little spark of celestial fire called conscience." Would that more men (and women) both in and out of government were like him today!

(This column is written by Shirley Prudhomme of Crivitz. Views expressed are her own and are in no way intended to be an official statement of the opinions of Peshtigo Times editors and publishers. She may be contacted by phone at 715-291-9002 or by e-mail to shirleyprudhommechickadee@yahoo.com.)


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