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THE CITY REBORN FROM THE ASHES OF AMERICA'S MOST DISASTROUS FOREST FIRE
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Country Cousin - Welcome Spring!...

Issue Date: March 22, 2017

The calendar says Spring is here, so I guess we have to believe it. Hard, though, when the wind feels more like the first of January and the poor robins are freezing to the trees, if they aren't getting blown off.

The weatherman keeps telling us things will improve, and surely they will. It's just a matter of when!

A LEGEND HAS GONE

When Chuck Berry died on Saturday, March 18, a legend passed into history. To those who came of age in the 50s and 60s, he was an icon, the true father of rock and roll.

Love his music or hate it, he started a whole new kind of music that many of us still love today.

He was a black musician who was loved by fans of all races, colors and creeds. He did not push a political agenda. He made music, and made people happy. He is quoted, "I made records for people who would buy them. No color, no ethnic, no political"I don't want that, never did."

That from a man who grew up in a sharply segregated society, who never saw a white person until he was three years old, and whose grandparents were slaves. He was arrested for armed robbery as a rebellious teen, and went to prison for three years.

He recorded countless songs and wrote more. A few of his hits, in case anyone has forgotten, include Maybelline, Brown Eyed Handsome man, My Ding A Ling, Roll Over Beethoven, Johnny B. Goode, School Day, Rock 'n' Roll Music, Memphis, Back in the USA, Promised Land, Sweet Little Sixteen, and many more.

Songs that he wrote were recorded not only by himself, but by top country and pop stars like the Beatles and the Rolling Stones and sold millions of copies all over the world.

There are rumors that Berry was into drugs, was a pervert, etc. Do not know if those rumors are fact or fiction. Do know that he started singing in his church choir at age six, made happy music, and was a phenomenally successful musician who lived to be 90 years old and died of natural causes, not from a drug overdose, with a reputed net worth in excess of $19 million. That says something.

You are gone, Chuck Berry, but your music lives on. Thank you for all the joy you brought to the world.

NEW SEASON, NEW START

Have always felt that New Year should start in Spring, not in the middle of winter. It's in Spring that we start a fresh new season, new gardens, clean houses, all kinds of optimistic notions for yard improvements, and for the kids, summer vacation means a whole new season of fun. Anything is possible in Spring!

HOW DID WE SURVIVE?

Thinking of new starts also leads to thinking about old ways.

With all the talk today about safety and security, it's hard to believe any of my generation lived to adulthood. We did lots of things that are unthinkable today. Most of us did survive, and without scars to show for it, mental or physical. Maybe we were tougher back then? Or maybe kids are just as tough today, but we just don't give them a chance?

We children rode in cars with no seat belts or air bags. Riding in the back of a pickup truck on a warm day was a special treat. Once, I was allowed to ride all the way from Marinette to Crivitz in a bathtub on a trailer Dad was towing behind the car.

We had no childproof lids on medicine bottles, doors or cabinets, and when we rode our bikes or roller skated we had no helmets. We drank water from the garden hose and not from a bottle.

We would leave home in the morning and play all day, as long as we were back when the street lights came on. No one was able to reach us all day. We usually showed up at home when we were hungry unless somebody else fed us. Mom knew that if something happened somebody would come and tell her.

"We played dodge ball and sometimes the ball would really hurt. Our games of "Take Away" were played all over the neighborhood, and sometimes got rougher than professional football.

We played with toy guns, sometimes even BB guns - cowboys and Indians, cops and robbers. If no toy guns were available we shot with our fingers or a stick.

We ate cupcakes, bread and real butter, drank whole milk and sugar soda, but we were never overweight...We were always outside playing.

Little League had tryouts and not everyone made the team. Those who didn't had to handle the disappointment. Some students weren't as smart as others or didn't work hard so they failed a grade and were held back. They lived with it. Our generation produced some of the world's greatest risk takers and problem solvers. We had freedom, failure, success and responsibility, and we learned how to deal with it all.

Most of us would rather swim in the pond instead of a pristine pool. Baths were a weekly event.

The term "cell phone" would have conjured up a phone in a jail cell, and a pager was the school PA system. We all took gym, not "PE", and flunking gym was not an option. PE must be much harder than gym.

Every year, someone taught the whole school a lesson by hitting the wet spot while running in the halls with leather sole shoes. How much better off we would be today if we only knew we could have sued the school system.

Speaking of school, we all said prayers...and the pledge. Staying in for detention after school caught all sorts of negative attention for about the next two weeks, from parents and friends. We must have had horribly damaged psyches.

Schools didn't offer 14-year-olds an abortion or condoms or talk about "alternate life styles". We wouldn't have known what they were anyway. But they did give us a couple of baby aspirin and cough syrup if we started getting the sniffles. Our elementary school didn't have a nurse. Aspirins and goiter pills were dispensed by the teacher, and a youngster who got sick was sent home.

We were supposed to accomplish something before we were allowed to be proud of ourselves.

There were no computers, Play Station, Nintendo, or X-box. We didn't even have TV until Junior High. There was radio with Roy Rogers, Gene Autry, Tom Mix, Hop Along Cassidy, The Lone Ranger and The Shadow Knows. But mostly unless it was raining we were too busy to listen. Saturday PTA Matinee movies were great. We walked downtown, alone or with younger siblings in tow. No adults.

Don't recall being bored, and wouldn't have admitted it in any case. Being bored was dangerous. Complaining of boredom brought on work assignments, like washing dishes, scrubbing baseboards or pulling weeds.

We played all over the neighborhood, often 'til well after dark, or we trekked out to the back 40. We climbed trees, swam in the river (unsupervised), swung into the water from a rope tied to an overhanging branch, built forts out of branches, brush and old pieces of plywood, made trails, and fought over who got to be Roy Rogers and who had to be Dale Evans. After dark, all the kids played "One o'clock and the ghost ain't here," until we were called in for bed.

"We played "Kick the Can" all over the neighborhood and "King of the Hill" on piles of gravel left on vacant construction sites. When we got hurt Mom treated it with a mercurochrome and then we got our butt spanked if we had been breaking the rules or doing something really stupid. Usually we didn't report an injury unless it bled a lot. Then there might be a band-aid from a box that cost 49 cents. Now it's a trip to the emergency room, followed by a $49 bottle of antibiotics and then a call to the attorney to sue the contractor for leaving that vicious pile of gravel out where it could attract kids.

It wasn't physical abuse when we got a paddling, it was expected if we sassed the neighbors, picked on a smaller kid, or heaven forbid, talked back to Mom or Dad.

We walked to school, and the PTA movies downtown, and sometimes we took the bus to Henes Park, all unaccompanied except by each other.

Lots of summer hours were spent using a hoe, weeding the garden, helping make hay, picking beans, or pushing the lawn mower with human power, not horse power. A ride-on mower? You've got to be kidding!

After we gathered all the ripe fruit and vegetables from garden and orchard we took them into the kitchen where we spent hours helping Mom put food away for the coming winter.

In the very early years, there wasn't even a refrigerator. There was an ice box, and huge chunks of ice were delivered daily by the ice man. All of us ate the icy shards he would sometimes dispense after we chased the truck far enough. Mom said not to eat it because it was cut from the river, but we never got sick.

Not a single person I knew had ever been told they were from a dysfunctional family, went in for therapy, or took a drug to calm down.

How did we survive?

VEGGIE EQUIVALENTS

Ever wonder how much you need to buy for that new recipe you want to try out? This table of equivalents should help.

Asparagus, 1 pound equals 3 cups chopped

Beans (string), 1 pound equals 4 cups chopped

Beets, 1 pound (5 medium) equals 2" cups chopped

Broccoli, pound equals 6 cups chopped

Cabbage, 1 pound equals 4" cups shredded

Carrots, 1 pound equals 3" cups sliced or grated

Celery, 1 pound equals 4 cups chopped

Cucumbers, 1 pound (2 medium) equals 4 cups sliced

Eggplant, 1 pound equals 4 cups chopped (6 cups raw, cubed equals 3 cups cooked)

Garlic, 1 clove equals 1 teaspoon chopped

Leeks, 1 pound equals 4 cups chopped (2 cups cooked)

Mushrooms, 1 pound equals 5 to 6 cups sliced equals 2 cups cooked

Onions, 1 pound equals 4 cups sliced equals 2 cups cooked

Parsnips, 1 pound unpeeled equals 1- cups cooked and pureed

Peas, 1 pound whole equals 1 to 1- cups shelled

Potatoes, 1 pound (3 medium) sliced equals 2 cups mashed

Pumpkin, 1 pound equals 4 cups chopped, or 2 cups cooked and drained

Spinach, 1 pound equals to 1 cup cooked

Squash (summer), 1 pound equals 4 cups grated, which equals 2 cups salted and drained

Squash (winter), 2 pounds equals 2- cups cooked and pureed

Sweet potatoes, 1 pound equals 4 cups grated equals 1 cup cooked and pureed

Swiss chard, 1 pound equals 5 to 6 cups packed leaves equals 1 to 1- cups cooked

Tomatoes, 1 pound (3 or 4 medium) equals 1- cups seeded pulp

Turnips or rutabaga, 1 pound equals 4 cups chopped or 2 cups cooked and mashed

COOKIN' TIME

CAULIFLOWER NUGGETS

It's still Lent. Here is a deep fried treat that has nothing to do with either fish or meat, and it's so good even the kids will probably eat it. You could also dip fish chunks into the batter and flour and fry them, if you wish, and also make battered French Fries. Think big.

Oil, as needed for frying

2 eggs

1 cups all-purpose flour

1 teaspoon garlic powder

1 teaspoons salt

teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Pinch of cayenne pepper

1 head cauliflower, divided into bite-size florets

BUFFALO SAUCE

6 tablespoons butter

1 cups buffalo-style hot sauce

cup chopped fresh parsley (optional)

Carrots and celery sticks, as needed for serving

Creamy blue cheese dressing, as needed for serving

Wash and prepare the cauliflower florets and let them dry. Use a Fry Daddy or other deep fryer, or pour two to three inches of oil into a large sauté pan. Heat the oil over medium-high heat until it shimmers on the surface and reads about 350 degrees on a thermometer. You can test the oil with a piece of cauliflower. If it bubbles and stays at the surface after you drop it in the oil, then you're good to go. Line a baking sheet with a few layers of paper towels. Whisk the eggs in a large, shallow bowl. In another large, shallow bowl, whisk the flour with the garlic powder, salt, black pepper and cayenne. Working with a few pieces at a time, dip the cauliflower florets into the egg until they are well coated. Then dip them into the flour mixture and toss well to coat. Repeat with the remaining cauliflower. Working in batches, fry the cauliflower until the pieces are evenly golden brown, 6 to 9 minutes. Remove the cauliflower with a slotted spoon and drain on the prepared paper-towel-lined baking sheet. In a small pot, melt the butter over medium heat. Whisk in the buffalo sauce until well combined. Reserve some of the fried cauliflower for those who like it plain, and add the rest to the sauce. Toss gently to coat. Garnish with parsley, if desired. Serve the cauliflower immediately, hot, with the carrots and celery on the side and the blue cheese dressing for dipping.

RICOTTA MEATBALLS WITH SPAGHETTI

Time for an Italian treat. Serve these meatballs over spaghetti and sprinkle on Parmesan cheese. Good with a tossed salad, crusty Italian bread and broccoli or other green vegetable. Or serve as a Hoagie, on a toasted Italian bun topped with melted Mozzarella cheese.

1/2 onion, minced

2 tablespoons olive oil

3 cloves garlic, minced

1 pound ground beef

1 cup whole milk ricotta cheese

1/4 cup packed chopped Italian parsley

1 egg, beaten

1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt

1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1 pinch cayenne pepper, or to taste

1/3 cup dry bread crumbs

2 tablespoons olive oil

1 (28 ounce) jar marinara sauce

1 cup water

Sauté onion in 2 tablespoons olive oil in a skillet over medium heat until onion is translucent, about 5 minutes. Stir garlic into onion and turn off heat. Transfer onion mixture to a large mixing bowl. Stir ground beef, ricotta cheese, parsley, egg, kosher salt, black pepper, and cayenne pepper with onion mixture until almost combined; stir in bread crumbs and continue to mix until thoroughly blended. Roll about 2 tablespoons of mixture into a 1-inch ball for each meatball. Pour 2 tablespoons olive oil in same skillet used to cook onions. Place skillet over medium heat and brown meatballs on all sides in hot oil, about 5 minutes. Hold a crumpled paper towel in a tongs and use it to remove excess grease from skillet. Pour marinara sauce and water over meatballs in skillet. Stir to combine and bring to a simmer. Reduce heat to medium-low and simmer, stirring occasionally, until meatballs are cooked through and no longer pink in the center, about 30 minutes.

APPLE CRISP CREPES

Try this for a brand new treat for a meatless breakfast.

1 cup packaged biscuit mix

3/4 cup milk

2 eggs

Filling:

2 medium Granny Smith apples, chopped

1 tablespoon lemon juice

1/2 cup old fashioned oatmeal

2 tablespoons packed brown sugar

1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

Topping:

2 containers (6 ounces each) vanilla or French vanilla yogurt

Ground cinnamon to taste

In a medium microwavable bowl, stir together all filling ingredients. Microwave uncovered on High 5 minutes, stirring once. Set aside. Then make the crepes by beating together the biscuit mix, milk and eggs until smooth. A whisk works well for this. Spray a six to seven inch skillet or crepe pan with buttery flavored cooking spray or grease lightly with butter; heat over medium heat. For each crepe, pour about 2 tablespoons batter into skillet. Immediately tilt and rotate skillet so a thin layer of batter covers the bottom. Cook until light brown. Run a wide spatula around edge to loosen; turn and cook other side until light brown. Repeat with remaining batter, greasing skillet as needed. As they cook, stack the crepes, placing waxed paper between each; cover to keep warm and prevent them from drying out while you cook the rest. To assemble, spoon one to two tablespoons of hot filling down the center of each crepe. Roll up and place seam side down on plate. Serve topped with plenty of yogurt and cinnamon.

The Country Cousin

Thought for the week:
Let's plan now for the trip of a lifetime, and start packing. Strange, isn't it, that a man will plan and pay dearly for travel to exotic destination, yet prepare not at all for the trip to eternal life.

(This column is written by Shirley Prudhomme of Crivitz. Views expressed are her own and are in no way intended to be an official statement of the opinions of Peshtigo Times editors and publishers. She may be contacted by phone at 715-291-9002 or by e-mail to shirleyprudhommechickadee@yahoo.com.)


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