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THE CITY REBORN FROM THE ASHES OF AMERICA'S MOST DISASTROUS FOREST FIRE
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Country Cousin

First Cow...

TIMESLand weather is up to its usual summer tricks....blast furnace hot one day, turn on the furnace cold the next. A young cousin visiting from California once during a cold, drizzly July asked if it's winter here all the time. Wouldn't believe it when we told her this was summer!

On the other hand, variety is the spice of life. When it's hot and muggy, we can blame our laziness on the weather. When it's cold and drizzly, we can blame it on rainy day blues. And when it's perfect, we can all rejoice with gusto and declare that it's far too nice a day to waste working!

Folks in more predictable areas don't have such good excuses. Think how boring it would be to be like my brothers in Arizona and wake up every single morning to forecasts of "hot, clear and sunny today...and tomorrow... and the day after that..."

STORM CLEANUP

Crews are about finished cleaning up after the storm on Sunday, June 11, and everyone we know now has their electric power restored. There shouldn't be nearly as much damage from storms for the rest of this summer unless they're tornadoes. Considering the damage from that June 11 storm and the ones that came before it, all the old, weak and shallow rooted trees along our roadsides and power lines certainly must be down by now. Blow, ye wild winds, blow!

JUNE DAIRY BREAKFAST

Wisconsin is known as America's Dairyland. June is Dairy Month. Dairy products comes from cows.

Therefore, it's most appropriate this month to pay some tribute to cows, the creatures who supply the product that fills our glasses and our ice cream cones, lightens our coffee, makes our cheeses, butters our bread, and tops our tacos, baked potatoes and strawberry shortcakes.

Yep! Milk and things made from it pretty often fills our palates and our plates, cups and glasses here in America's Dairyland.

Wisconsin's wonderful dairy products will be especially celebrated this coming Sunday, June 25 from 7:30 a.m. to noon at Marinette County's annual June Dairy Month Breakfast on the Farm at Golden Ridge Dairy in the Town of Beaver at W7419 18th Road south of Crivitz off Hwy. 141. Hosts are David and Sheila Denowski and their family.

Breakfast on the Farm is traditionally a huge event in Marinette County. The 2016 Breakfast on the Farm used:

*467 gallons of milk

ŕ,000 pounds sausage

蕍 pounds ham

衋 pounds of cheese

ඩ pounds of butter

ŕ,500 pounds of eggs

薄 boxes of pancake mix

薱 gallons of ice cream

*54 gallons of applesauce

藀 pounds of strawberries

Ŝ gallons chocolate syrup

൫ gallons fresh maple syrup

*32 gallons orange juice

*2 pallets bottled water

*7.5 gallons coffee cream

*12 gallons cranberry juice

FIRST COW

Bet you didn't know that in days of yore the United States of America not only had a First Family as it does now, but had First Cows as well. And the last and most famous of those First Cows was Pauline Wayne, who went to Washington in 1910 as a gift to President William Howard Taft from Wisconsin Senator Isaac Stephenson.

A photo portrait of Pauline Wayne posing gracefully on the lawn in front of the State, War and Navy Building in Washington is among the treasures in the Library of Congress. She was a lovely black and white registered Holstein/Friesian, and was given to Taft after the untimely death of Mooly Wooly, the cow Taft brought with him to Washington.

The First Cows served a most useful purpose during their terms at the White House, supplying fresh high quality milk, butter and cream for the First Families and their guests.

President Taft was reportedly one of the last presidents to keep a cow on the White House grounds in Washington, DC, but he certainly was not the first.

You see, there were no refrigerators in those days, and no refrigerated tank cars and such. Until the late 19th Century, Washington, DC had no dairy or milk delivery companies. Having dairy cows on the White House grounds was almost a necessity, and they were allowed to graze on the lawns surrounding the White House.

Pauline Wayne, the last cow to dine at the White House, somehow caught the fancy of the nation's press, starting on Nov. 4, 1910, the day she arrived at the White House. The 1,500-pound mother-to-be had traveled from Kenosha by train in a big crate. She had been a member of Stephenson's farm in Marinette County.

She was met at Union Station by a group of White House employees, who accompanied her to the stables and the grassy area near the State, War and Navy Building, which later was known as the Eisenhower Executive Office Building, according to documents from the Presidential Pet Museum.

Her arrival made the Nov. 4 edition of The New York Times, which reported she was estimated to give 7.5 gallons of milk each day. A few days after Pauline arrived to fill her new position she gave birth to a calf named Big Bill, who went off to live in Maryland.

News reports of the day show that Pauline Wayne became a popular show piece at the 1911 International Dairymen's Exposition in Milwaukee, where her milk was sold to fans in tiny souvenir bottles for 50 cents each.

BOVINE DRAMA

According to the Presidential Pet Museum, in an odd series of events, Pauline Wayne somehow got lost on her way to the dairy show, and narrowly escaped death in a slaughterhouse.

She was being shipped in a private train car attached to a whole train of cattle cars headed for the Chicago stock cars. Somehow the car containing the presidential cow was mistakenly switched and went to the Chicago stockyards instead of the Milwaukee Exposition and she was missing for two days before she was located. White House attendants managed to convince the stockyard people that she was indeed the First Cow, and she was saved "from the bludgeon of the slaughterer," according to a report in the New York Times.

Then, about a year later, Pauline was personally robbed. According to a report in a September, 1912 edition of The Milwaukee Sentinel, an agriculture teacher from Ohio spotted the famed cow while he was visiting Washington. With no security officers in sight he approached the cow and managed to obtain a sample of her milk. He told reporters the milk tasted every bit as good as he had heard it was. Story didn't say whether or not the man was prosecuted.

The media seemed somewhat obsessed with the First Cow from Wisconsin. Archives of National Journal show that more than 20 stories about her were published between 1910 and 1912. She was invited to numerous cow shows, which President Taft declined, and even was invited to perform in a traveling production of the play, "Way Down East." That offer also was declined.

According to the Pet Museum story, Pauline Wayne paid a high price for being a celebrity, and her health visibly declined. (She was probably pining for her home in Wisconsin and good, sweet Wisconsin grass and fresh clean water, but the article didn't say that.)

Anyway, because of her failing health, when President Taft's term came to a close, he sent her back to live on Stephenson's farm. By then she was nearly seven years old. A New York Times story on Feb. 2, 1913, reported that Stephenson was glad to have Pauline back, and quoted him as saying she would "add dignity" to his herd.

A cowbell once worn by Pauline Wayne, the cow from Marinette County who was the last of this nation's Presidential cows, is among the treasures in the Presidential Pet Museum - and even after 100 years, it still works!

The Presidential Pet Museum, currently closed for some repair work, is located in a barn on the property of its founder, Claire McLean near her home in Lothain, MD.

GROWIN' THINGS

Wisconsin surely is the land flowing with milk and honey... and maple syrup, and fresh strawberries and so much more. Store-bought products shipped in from other parts of America, which as a whole also flows with milk and honey, do not come close to matching the flavor of home-grown Wisconsin products. Maybe it's the water, maybe it's the soil, or maybe it's the air itself. We are indeed blessed. Kentucky horse breeders say their pampered stock prefer Wisconsin hay to that from any other state! So as the rest of the seasons progress, buy local, and pick your own whenever you can.

BEAUTIFUL BUTTERFLIES

One of the joys of summer in TIMESland has always been watching butterflies and moths. One summer were were privileged to have two big, beautiful Luna moths in our orchard.

In recent years, butterflies, like honey bees, have become a bit scarce. The monarch butterfly, once so abundant, has become increasingly hard to find.

We need the butterflies, birds and bees to pollinate our gardens and orchards so things we love will continue to grow.

Incidentally, the honey bee is Wisconsin's official State Insect, a selection that was initially proposed by then State Rep. Richard P. Matty of Crivitz.

To help butterflies make a com back, provide them with as much food and shelter as you can, and avoid the use of pesticides in your gardens.

The caterpillars ned plants to eat and females lay their eggs on suitable host plants for their young, so having them on your property will attract the butterflies, which then need some food for themselves as well.

Good host plants for a variety of butterfly larva are aspen, bleeding heart, clover, lupines, milkweed (especially good for monarchs), roses, sage brush, spirea, wild lilacs, vetch and willows.

Adult butterflies like things like asters, bee balm, elderberries, daisies, lavender, black eyed susans, milkweed, purple coneflower sage brush, thistles, sunflowers, spirea, yarrow, and yes, even thistles.

If these plants are growing wild on your property, consider letting some of them thrive, especially milkweed. Even though it's getting late in the season, you might want to plant or transplant some of the flowers they like.

Also, butterfly experts say they need to be warm in order to fly, so grow the plants that attract them in sunny spots, protected from wind by large shrubs, buildings or other windbreak, and a few large, flat rocks placed in the sun to warm up is heat and the butterflies that will rest on them.

Then, to provide a place for the chrysalis, leave some stands of tall grass and weeds or piles of leaves or sticks in somewhat sheltered areas.

If the monarchs are happy in your yard they may return year after year from their annual migration. Many varieties do not migrate, and may choose to spend their winters at your place, and raise their young there next spring. If they're staying through the winter they like some litter left around for shelter near logs or leaves at the edge of the yard.

COOKIN' TIME

Summer eating is getting into full swing. Patronize the pick-your-own places and farmer's markets as the season progresses, and enjoy!

GRILL PACKETS

Hot weather calls for cooking outdoors as much as possible, even when there isn't a camping trip involved. Here's a full meal in a packet. All you need to complete it are a bowl of washed fresh strawberries with cups of sugar to dip them in. Strawberry shortcake would be too much of a good thing!

SMOKED SAUSAGE PACKETS

3/4 pound fresh green bans, trimmed and halved

1/2 pound red potatoes, quartered

1 large onion, sliced

1 pound smoked sausage, cut into 1 inch pieces

1 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon ground black pepper

1 teaspoon vegetable oil

1 teaspoon butter

1/3 cup water

On a large sheet of foil place the green beans, potato and onion, in that order. Sprinkle on salt and pepper, then add the sausage. sprinkle with oil and top with butter. Seal the packet almost completely, but leave an opening large enough to pour in the water. Complete the seal. Place on the grill and cook for about half an hour, turning once, until the sausage is browned and the vegetables are tender. Serves four to six.

TEXICAN CHICKEN PACKETS

Serve with buttered rice and salsa if you like for a complete southwest-style meal. Recipe makes four packets.

1 cup corn kernels, fresh or frozen or canned

1 cup salsa, hot or medium or mild, drained of excess moisture

1 14.5 ounce can black beans, drained

4 heavy-duty aluminum foil sheets, 18" x 12"

4 sprigs cilantro

4 boneless, skinless chicken breasts

salt and pepper

4 teaspoons taco seasoning

1 cup Mexican cheese blend, shredded

4 lime wedges

Preheat outdoor grill to medium-high heat or preheat oven to 350 degrees. In a large bowl stir together corn, salsa and beans until evenly combined. Place four 18" x 12" pieces of heavy foil on counter and spray each with cooking spray. Divide the veggie mixture evenly among the packets and place one cilantro sprig on top. Season both sides of chicken breasts with salt and pepper and approximately 1 tsp taco seasoning per breast. Place seasoned chicken on top of veggies. Fold long sides of foil up and over chicken and bring edges together. Roll the foil together, moving downward until 1 to 2 inches from top of chicken. Fold both short ends together to seal the packet, but make sure to leave enough space inside the packet for steam expansion. Place packets directly on grill or on a baking sheet in the oven. Grill 15൜ minutes or bake 30൫ minutes in the oven, until the center is no longer pink. Cooking times may vary depending upon thickness of chicken breasts. Remove from grill or oven and carefully open packets to allow steam to escape. Sprinkle an equal amount of cheese on top of each piece of chicken, close foil and allow it to sit 2 minutes or until cheese has melted. Serve with a lime wedge for squeezing and enjoy!

STRAWBERRY CHEESECAKE CUPS

Very appropriate for the final days of June Dairy Month.

1-1/2 cups graham cracker crumbs

2 tablespoons sugar

1/3 cup unsalted butter, softened

BATTER:

4 egg whites

3/4 cup unsalted butter, softened

1 cup plus 2 tablespoons sugar

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1-1/2 cups all-purpose flour

1 teaspoon baking powder

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/2 cup sour cream

2 cups coarsely chopped fresh strawberries

FROSTING:

2 packages (8 ounces each) cream cheese, softened

1 cup unsalted butter, softened

3-3/4 cups confectioners' sugar

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Fresh strawberries and graham cracker crumbs

Line 24 muffin tins with paper liners; set aside. Place the cracker crumbs, sugar and butter in a food processor; cover and process until fine crumbs form. Press tablespoonfuls onto bottoms of liners. Bake at 350 for 3-5 minutes or until lightly browned. Set aside to cool.

Place egg whites in a large bowl; let stand at room temperature for 30 minutes. In a large bowl, cream the butter, sugar and vanilla until light and fluffy. In another bowl, combine the flour, baking powder and salt; add to the creamed mixture alternately with sour cream, beating well after each addition. Beat egg whites with clean beaters until stiff peaks form. Fold a third of the egg whites into batter. Fold in remaining egg whites and strawberries.

Fill muffin cups three-fourths full. Bake at 350 for 18-22 minutes or until a toothpick inserted near the center comes out clean. Cool for 10 minutes before removing from pans to wire racks to cool completely.

In a large bowl, beat cream cheese and butter until fluffy. Add confectioners' sugar and vanilla; beat until smooth. Frost tops. Garnish with additional strawberries and cracker crumbs. Makes 2 dozen. Store in the fridge.

Thought for the week: "Jerry from Amberg" spotted a sign that reads: "Sinning is like using a credit card.....Fun now...Pay later!" Pretty true, when you think about it.

Country Cousin

(This column is written by Shirley Prudhomme of Crivitz. Views expressed are her own and are in no way intended to be an official statement of the opinions of Peshtigo Times editors and publishers. She may be contacted by phone at 715-291-9002 or by e-mail to shirleyprudhommechickadee@yahoo.com.)


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