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THE CITY REBORN FROM THE ASHES OF AMERICA'S MOST DISASTROUS FOREST FIRE
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Visit Wall-Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker was in Crivitz Saturday to visit the Wall That Heals. He was greeted by Crivitz Village President John Deschane. Gov. Walker spoke at the 10am ceremony honoring Vietnam veterans for their service and sacrifice. Top Photo-Members of the Crivitz American Legion raise the flags at opening ceremonies on Thursday. Middle Photo-Pictured are some of the over 25,000 people that came to Crivitz to see the Wall That Heals. Bottom Photo-Governor Walker is welcomed to Crivitz by Village President John Deschane while Crivitz Police Chief Mike Frievalt looks on.

Thousands Pay Tribute To Vietnam Heroes During Wall That Heals Visit

Issue Date: September 6, 2018

By noon on Saturday, Sept. 1, more than 12,000 visitors had come to Crivitz to view The Wall That Heals and pay their respects to the 58,318 men and women of the American military who gave their lives in the jungles of Vietnam. By the time of the closing ceremonies on Sunday, Sept. 2 that number had officially grown to 21,342, more than 22 times the entire population of Crivitz. And it did not include the hundreds of others who came in through back and side entrances and were not counted.

They came from all over Marinette, Menominee and Oconto counties and points far beyond. Some were visiting in the area because of the Labor Day weekend. Some traveled many miles for the specific purpose of paying tribute to the memories of loved ones who had fought in the Vietnam War, and some traveled those miles to show a long overdue thanks and respect to men and women who fought and died at their country's behest, to protect the freedoms and lifestyle we all enjoy.

One of the volunteers told of assisting a World War II veteran who had come from his home many miles away as a tribute to his son, whose name is on the wall.

A family checking names at random learned that a great uncle they hadn't known existed had been among the thousands killed in the Vietnam War.

Three cousins who had never known one another met while all were at the same spot at the same time, searching the wall for the name of an uncle none of them had ever met.

The respect shown to the veterans present, The Wall, and the lives it represents was in sharp contrast to the abuse heaped on many of the Vietnam veterans decades ago when they returned to America after living through horrors of Vietnam.

That solemn, black granite monument, a 3/4-size replica of the Vietnam Memorial Wall in Washington, DC, seems to be doing the job it was designed to do - bring healing and closure to the scars left on the fabric of America by the most controversial war in our nation's history.

For the entire four day stay of The Wall in Marinette County, there was not a protester to be seen. From its arrival at the Wisconsin/Michigan border on Tuesday, Aug. 28 to its departure from Crivitz after closing ceremonies at 1:30 p.m. and the closing at 3:30 p.m. on Sunday, The Wall and those who visited it, veterans and civilians alike, were treated with courtesy, respect, sympathy and love. Visitors were reminded The Wall was not designed to glorify war, but to honor the heroes who died for our freedom.

An impressive cavalcade of police, rescue and fire vehicles, motorcycles, Veterans' organizations and private vehicles met the semi carrying The Wall at the Michigan border and accompanied it through Menominee, Marinette, Peshtigo, Coleman and Pound en route to Crivitz Veterans Memorial Park in Crivitz on Tuesday, Aug. 28.

Teams of volunteers set up The Wall on Wednesday, in preparation for opening ceremonies at 9 a.m. Thursday, Aug. 30, when the flags were raised by VFW Post 2063, and Daniel J. Zimmerman, Secretary of the Wisconsin Department of Veterans Affairs gave the opening address, followed by reading of names of local heroes enshrined on The Wall.

Addresses at the 6 p.m. "Salute to America" on Thursday, Aug. 30 were given by Don Landwehr, a Vietnam veteran and former Navy Seal, and Jeff Mursau, District 36 Representative to the State Assembly. Music by The Remnants Barbershop Chorus and Common Thread completed the evening.

All day Thursday and Friday, visitors came and went steadily, and at 7 p.m. they enjoyed music by Surrendered Heart. The Crivitz American Legion had a food stand set up outside the park for each day of the visit, but no food or drink were allowed inside the park, which was considered hallowed ground while The Wall was housed there.

Throughout the nights, hundreds of lights gleamed at the base of The Wall, stretching 375 feet from end to end. Those candles were visible even to casual traffic passing by. By day, flowers and memorabilia left by visitors marked the base of the 7 1/2 foot high wall. Short enough for most people to see and make pencil etchings of names engraved on it. Volunteers, no fewer than three at a time, were on duty round the clock, guarding the wall, providing information and helping visitors find the names they came to find. Some of the visitors placed photos and remembrances at the base of the wall at the spot that meant the most to them. As the late Ronald Reagan said of the fallen Vietnam heroes, "now their only address is on this wall."

Parked on the grounds was the educational trailer that accompanies The Wall. Under its canopies visitors could see Vietnam memorabilia, view a brief filmed history of the Vietnam War and a brief history of the Vietnam Memorial, view photos of local heroes whose names are enshrined on The Wall. Elsewhere on the grounds was a tented table with flags and mementos of Iraq and Afghanistan and the 7,000 veterans who died there. Doing beautiful individual renditions of the National Anthem, "The Star Spangled Banner" at various times during the four day visit were Lacey Kroll, Talor Long, Kit Cleereman and Dewey Sessler.

Friday, Aug. 31 featured a 7 p.m. concert by Surrendered Heart.

At the "Salute to Veterans" program at 10 a.m. on Saturday, Sept. 1, emcee Rebecca Deschane introduced speakers Andrew Ertl, to read a speech prepared by 8th District Congressman Mike Gallagher; Christopher Deschane, a former Air Force Captain who is a veteran of the war in Iraq; Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker, and Mursau.

Present in the crowd that day in an unofficial capacity and not as part of the program were State Sen. Tom Tiffany, of Hazelhurst, along with many other state, local and county officials who came to pay their respects.

At the outset, Rebecca Deschane reminded everyone that The Wall That Heals and the national monument it depicts are meant as symbols of America's honor, to show respect and appreciation not only for those who gave their lives in Vietnam, but also for those who served in the military before and since and those who are serving now.

The Traveling Wall That Heals allows the souls whose names are enshrined on it to live once more on comfortable grounds close to home, Deschane said.

She added it is not meant to honor war, but to honor the brave men and women who make honorable peace possible, and quoted a letter in which General Douglas McArthur wrote, "The soldier above all others prays for peace, for it is the soldier who must suffer and bear the deepest wounds and scars of war."

She turned the podium over to Ertl, who read the speech prepared by Gallagher, who was unable to attend. Both Ertl and Gallagher are Marine Corps veterans who served in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Gallagher had written: "I thank God for the veteran's community of northeast Wisconsin"We take care of each other in times of national discord." He cautioned that America again is in a time of national discord, and declared, "Our national revival must take place here at home."

He said the Vietnam veterans had come home to a polarized, angry nation and suffered for it, but apparently America had learned its lesson because in the current time of discord, even in the heat of debate, servicemen have been treated well. He said the United States has a world approval rate of 77 percent and added, "It is a testament to the American character that our one time enemies become our friends."

Christopher Deschane, who graduated from the Air Force Academy in 2003, became a captain in 2008 and then left the military to work in the private sector.

He described The Wall as "haunting," and spoke of bringing his children to to see it. His 9-year-old daughter asked why the name of their grandfather, "Papa John," was not on the wall, because she knew he had been in Vietnam. He explained Papa John had flown missions over Vietnam, had been there, but he came home and is very much alive. Even at that age, she was horrified when he explained the names were only the ones who died and did not come home. "But there are so many!" she exclaimed, and he agreed that was true.

He went on to say that Americans must be ready to fight if needed, and even in peace they must be sentinels standing in watch to be sure evil does not prevail. "Tyrants view our freedom with jealousy and fear!"

During his military service, "Our mission was clear, we left no man behind," Deschane said, adding that he served in a special unit assigned to seek information on the fate of servicemen still missing from Vietnam. When the war ended there were 2,646 servicemen listed as missing in action (MIA). Some were prisoners of the North Vietnamese, others were killed in action but remains were not found. Through determined investigations, remains of about 40 percent of those MIAs have been found and brought home, but 1,597 are still missing. "We won't give up and we won't forget," Deschane promised.

He said of his work with the Air Force Special Operations Command Team, "There was no success unless every man pulled his weight," and asked, "How do we thank one for the deeds of many?" The men who fought in Vietnam sacrificed themselves for the future, "not for what was, but for the promise of what can be."

"We are a nation of ideals," he said, quoting the late John McCain, who spent over five years in the "Hanoi Hilton" POW camp.

He expressed hope America will not become disillusioned by recent revelations about leaders in our trusted institutions "".in our government, in our church, and in the technology field."

"We are not all meant to be John McCain, but we can help our neighbor carry out his trash," he urged, adding "we can volunteer, we can run for office, we can vote."

He said keeping America strong and free is the way to honor the veterans who responded, "those who said here I am, take me!"

"We've seen a lot of tears here," observed Mursau, who was called to speak next. Mursau said his father was a forward scout in World War II, and by listening to him he had learned that the large things done to help veterans count for a lot - things like medical care, benefits, etc, "but it's the small things that will warm a veteran's heart, even things as small as thanking them for their service and listening when they talk about the hardships they and their families went through."

Mursau introduced Gov. Walker, who was met with standing applause.

"We in America are endowed by our creator and defined by our Constitution," Walker said, "but we are defended every day by our military men and women".We live in the land of the free because of the brave." He pointed out that even in times of peace, we are protected because these men and women are prepared to fight for us if they must.

Walker asked veterans in the audience to stand depending on when they served. Only one veteran, Val Sikowski of Crivitz, was from World War II. Former State Rep. Richard Matty was one of the Korean War veterans present. There were numerous veterans from Vietnam, Dessert Storm and later.

"We quite literally wouldn't be here today without you and others like you," Walker told them. "Today, we're all brothers and sisters together in support of all our veterans."

Walker said he could not stay long after the program because he had to get back to the flooded areas in the southern half of the state, to decide when and where National Guard should be deployed to help. He said more rain was predicted there for the coming week and asked everyone to pray for those in the flooded areas.

Walker expressed thanks to those who take The Wall around the nation, and expressed thanks to those in organizations that support Boys State and Scouting, along with hope they will continue their support of those programs. He himself was an Eagle Scout and is a former Boys' State representative.

Walker noted of the 58,000 names on The Wall, 1,239 are from Wisconsin, and 57,000 persons from Wisconsin served in the Vietnam War.

Walker said Vietnam prisoner of war hero Capt. Lance P. Sijan - 29E, Row 62 on the right hand side - was a close family friend. On Nov. 9. 1967 Sijan's plane was shot down over Vietnam. He was injured in the crash, but made contact with his unit two days later. He was not found, and struggled through the jungle, alone and injured, until Christmas Day of 1967, when he was captured by the North Vietnamese.

Despite his injuries, he escaped, but later was captured again. On Jan. 22, 1968, he died as a POW, and years later his parents received his posthumously awarded Congressional Medal of Honor. According to others imprisoned with Sijan, he was targeted for torture by the North Vietnamese because of his already wretched physical condition. Tortured, ill and suffering, he never broke his code of conduct, never caved to the demands of his captors to reveal information or otherwise betray America.

Thanks largely to the efforts of his sister, Jeannine, last May a new plaza at the General Mitchell International Airport in Milwaukee was dedicated in Sijan's honor.

Again referring to The Wall, Walker declared, "These names aren't just names - they are real people," and added, "remembering is not just about how they died, but about how they lived."

Walker said McCain was in the Hanoi Hilton at the same time as Saijon and had written of him, "this is the story of a free man from a free country, who kept his dignity to the last moment of his life".Though they took his life they could not take his dignity!"

Walker noted that Sen. McCain's wife and daughter had gone to The Wall in Washington, DC on the morning of his funeral, and said he had been told that the senator often would go there alone, "and just stand and remember."

Walker had visited The Wall as a young man with the American Legion boys State in 1985. "It's a sacred time to be near that wall," he declared. He added if you look closely at The Wall on a sunny day you can see your reflection on the other side. He suggested the best way to pay tribute to those inscribed on it, "is for us to make sure a little bit of them, a little bit of what they fought for, shines in each and every one of us."

Next came the POW/MIA Table Ceremony conducted by Rolling Thunder. The group also maintains an "In Memory" honor roll of veterans who came home from Vietnam but died later as a result of Agent Orange, PTS, suicide, and other causes related to their military service.

Wisconsin still has 39 veterans who have never returned, and remain on the POW/MIA list. "We do it to honor and remember them, for they are not with us," he said of the Table Ceremony.

The table is round, the chair is empty, "for they are not with us, but we ever hope for their return." The white cloth signifies purity "and their willingness to answer our country's call to arms so future generations can remain free." The table is set for one, "signifying the frailty of one against all his oppressors." The wine glass is inverted, the candle is lit, "to light their way back home, away from their captors."

There is a black ribbon on the candle, and a single rose, to help families and loved ones keep the faith and pray for their return, a slice of lemon on the plate to remind us of their bitter fate if we do not bring them home, salt to symbolize tears of the families as they wait and remember, a Bible, representing strength, and faith in a nation founded as "one nation, under God," and finally a faded picture of the missing veteran. He said as the years pass finding them gets harder and harder, "and the longer they are missing, the easier they are to forget."

Later on Saturday there was a Candlelight Vigil starting at 8:30 pm. and a reading of names from The Wall.

Events on Sunday, Sept. 2, final day of The Wall in Crivitz, began with comments from Crivitz Village President, John Deschane, a Vietnam veteran and the person most responsible for bringing The Wall to Crivitz. Deschane declared the word he heard most often to describe The Wall was "awesome," and said he was awed by the number of people who expressed thanks for bringing The Wall here and giving them the ability to welcome Vietnam veterans home.

"We should thank God for sending us beautiful weather for these special days, but mostly we should thank God for sending his Son to die for our sins so we can be confident that those whose names are inscribed on that wall are safely with him in Heaven," Deschane added.

Speaking as president of the village and co-chair of the committee that worked so long and hard to bring The Wall That Heals to Crivitz, Deschane expressed thanks to all of the residents of Crivitz, Marinette and Menominee counties, and those who came from all over Wisconsin, Upper Michigan and the United States to pay respect to those who have given their lives during their service in Vietnam and to give a hearty and sincere "Welcome Home" to our Vietnam War veterans.

"I was told that the attendance in Crivitz was the highest they have had in the past five years. Including the thousands of you who lined the streets and roadways of the communities the escort passed through on its way from Menominee to Crivitz and those who came to the park when The Wall That Heals arrived, there were over 25,000 people who viewed The Wall That Heals," Deschane said. He added, "While the number of visitors astounded us, what was more moving were the stories and tears of healing that were shed over the four days The Wall was in Crivitz. I am humbled that you turned out in such numbers and thank you for coming."

He said many times during committee meetings over the past year the comment was made the this event is "about the names", the 58,318 names of those who died as a result of their service in Vietnam and have their names inscribed on 140 panels.

"To be able to walk along The Wall and speak to family members, veterans and comrades of the fallen service members was moving. The stories, the tears and emotions held in by many for over 50 years that came flooding out when they found a name on The Wall moved each and every volunteer to tears as well," Deschane said.

"The programs that were presented during the ceremonies not only honored the fallen but reached out and honored our returning Vietnam warriors, treating them in the manner returning heroes should have been treated 50 years ago. To those Vietnam veterans who say we must die to be honored for our service, I emphatically say no; the turnout and support shown during this event shows you that you are honored by your communities for risking your lives to protect the freedoms we, as Americans, cherish!" Deschane declared.

He thanked area communities for their cooperation and turnout in the rain on Tuesday when the tractor and trailer carrying The Wall to Crivitz passed through. "I was a part of that escort and it was an emotional time to see so many people lining the streets and road sides as the escort passed through your towns."

He also thanked the over 300 volunteers who staffed The Wall during its time in Crivitz. He said many of them worked their assigned times, and then either stayed late or came back even when not scheduled, to willingly help with anything that needed to be done, including assisting those who were looking for a specific name on The Wall.

"A special thanks to those who staffed the volunteer tent, information center and/or spent their time emptying the trash and keeping the area clean. It is because of you and your volunteer efforts our fallen and returning service members were able to find peace," Deschane went on.

He expressed particular thanks to the "Core Committee," including co-chair Sally Witt and members Ginger Deschane (his sister-in-law), Crivitz Public Works Supervisor Glen Franzen, Bunny Peplinski (who organized the volunteers), Village Clerk/TreasurerMarilyn Padgett, Dewey Sessler, Irene Bauer, Ceil Kostreva "and (of course) Snake."

He said he did not even know Snake's real name, but he did know that he had read in the newspaper about The Wall coming to Crivitz, need for volunteers, and a meeting of the organizing committee. "He rode up here from Green Bay on his motorcycle and has been at every meeting since," Deschane said.

"There are not enough words to thank you for the time you spent at The Wall over the four days it was here in Crivitz, as well as the time you have put in over the past year organizing, planning, and raising the necessary funds for this event to be successful," Deschane told the committee members. He added I ask any one who sees one of these individuals to thank them. He also thanked sponsors, those who gave monetary donations, time, equipment, and talent. "Because of your generous support we always knew we would have the resources to do what needed to be done to make this event a success," Deschane said.

He went on, "To the Village of Crivitz staff: you hit it out of the park! Over the past months you have made our village shine, you answered questions, you did whatever was needed to be done to make this event the success it was. To the School District of Crivitz: I thank you. Your generosity in the loaned equipment and people to help with this event is truly appreciated."

He expressed special thanks to the Crivitz High School volleyball team who came to help out when more help was needed, and to members of the Crivitz High School football team who spent all day Wednesday afternoon assembling and disassembling The Wall and would help with dissembling it for its departure later that day, and to Tim Tetz and Cynthia Long of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund "for the time and effort they put in to make this event so memorable."

Deschane said during all the committee meetings over the past year the common theme was: "It's about the names," meaning the inscribed names of the 58,318 fallen soldiers who gave their lives in the service of our country. He added there are 257 students attending Crivitz High School, 952 residents in the Village of Crivitz, and 40,000 is the total population of Marinette County.

"There are 61 times more names inscribed on that wall than there are living in Crivitz," Deschane declared. "More people gave their lives in Vietnam than there are people in Marinette County! I urge you, remember those names! They did so that we may continue to live in the land of the free and the home of the brave!"

He noted there is also a memory board listing those who died as a result of Vietnam War illnesses.

Deschane said as a personal insight, "I served in Vietnam and truly didn't realize until this time how much emotion from my time there was bottled up inside of me. The Wall and the Mobile Information Center brought it all back and I was able to finally express some of that emotion to my family and maybe my healing can now begin. I cannot express in words what that means to me. But I do now understand why it is called The Wall That Heals."

The healing theme was also stressed by Rev. David Pleuss, pastor of Faith Evangelical Presbyterian Church in Crivitz and a 1st Lieutenant in the U. S. Army Reserve, who gave the final formal address of the four day event.

Rev. Pleuss said when first asked to talk at The Wall That Heals ceremonies, he had asked, "What have I done that I should be allowed to speak before all of you, to memorialize the lives of the 58,000 men and women listed on Th Wall That Heals?" He said because he is so young, what he knew about the Vietnam War came from what he had learned in history classes.

Then, he said, he realized that as a pastor he spends a lot of time thinking of healing, and "the message God has laid upon my heart is in the area of healing."

He spoke of the Vietnam War as being "an ugly part of our nation's history, a time when we were at odds with one another": He said our nation needs to heal from the hatred and condition that existed then and from the conditions that continue to exist today."

"I think about how we failed each other so often. "I apologize to the veterans. You were not treated the way you deserved." He asked them to forgive, since forgiveness is a part of healing.

He spoke of the Israelites wandering in the dessert and how God gave Moses a stick to heal the brackish water and make it fit to drink, and stressed it wasn't really the stick that healed the waters, but God used that stick, made it the stick that heals, and compared it to The Wall That Heals.

"Do you need healing today?" he asked. "I do believe there is healing available through this wall and through the Lord"spiritual healing, to give or receive forgiveness""

"I see our country repeating itself," he cautioned. "This is becoming a time of great division".We need healing today we need healing as a nation"We need healing as individuals"Before you leave here today, ask to be healed," he urged, and concluded, "May God heal you and bless you!"

Next came the introduction of David Pazynski and "Snake" who were to read the names of local people inscribed on The Wall.

Before that happened, Snake, who is a leader of Rolling Thunder, turned to The Wall and declared, "I want my brothers on the wall to hear, because I know they are listening," and added, "Let us not forget the thousands of Vietnam veterans whose names are not on that wall"who died of Agent Orange"" He said it is not well known that 150,000 to 200,000 Vietnam veterans committed suicide.

"As Rolling Thunder says, dieing for your country is not the worst that can happen"Being forgotten is!"

This was followed by the Rolling Thunder flag folding ceremony and presentation of the flags to the three local Gold Star families who were specially recognized - the Porfilio family of Crivitz, the Donald Christ family of Wausaukee, and the Jerry Rouse family of Coleman.

At 3:30 p.m. flags on the grounds were lowered by members of Crivitz VFW Post 2063 and the haunting strains of Echo Taps played by the Vietnam Veterans of America Chapter 224 filled the air. Then volunteers began dismantling the the long granite wall and loading the sections into the semi for its move to the next community on the 2018 schedule.

When it was all over, a rainbow arched overhead as Police Chief Mike Frievalt, squad car sirens blowing and lights flashing, accompanied the semi to the village limits for the move to its next stop, in Milan, Indiana. This was its only stop in Wisconsin this year.






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Margaret M. Schmidt

09-06-2018Obituaries
Shirley M. Schounard

09-06-2018Obituaries
Sharon A. Szabo

09-06-2018Obituaries
Myrtle M. Van Laarhoven

09-06-2018Obituaries
Tyler G. Walker

09-06-2018Obituaries
Robert G. Westoff

09-06-2018Obituaries
Nancy J. Wituschek

09-06-2018Obituaries
Shirley Zoeller

09-06-2018Perspectives
Country Cousin

09-06-2018Perspectives
Trail Camera Stars

09-06-2018Perspectives
From our readers

09-06-2018Sports
Peshtigo Stays UnBeaten in PackerLand

09-06-2018Sports
Peshtigo Wins Tri-City Match-Up

09-06-2018Sports
DNR Conservation Wardens reminder to ATV and UTV riders: "Wear it, Wisconsin!"

09-06-2018Sports
Hansen/Polomis Top Area Runners At Irish Waters

09-06-2018Community - Wausaukee
50 Unites Blood Needed for Sept. 10

09-06-2018Community - Wausaukee
Big Wausaukee Fall Fest Oct. 6

09-06-2018Community - Wausaukee
Legion Post 66 Meeting Sept. 8

09-06-2018Community - Wausaukee
Silver Cliff Auxiliary To Meet Sept. 10th

09-06-2018Community - Crivitz
31st Annual Ruffed Grouse Society Sportsmen Banquet

09-06-2018Community - Coleman
Equity Big Tractor, Truck Pulls, Bands Sept. 15th

09-06-2018Community - Coleman
Utility Board To Meet Sept. 10

09-06-2018Community - Coleman
Pound Fire Dept. Gets WPS Grant

09-06-2018Community - Coleman
Coleman HS Class of 1957 Reunion Sept. 14

09-06-2018Front Page
Thousands Pay Tribute To Vietnam Heroes During Wall That Heals Visit

09-06-2018Front Page
Name Richard Badgley As New Peshtigo Police Chief

09-06-2018Front Page
Family Seeks Reopening Of Cottage Lane Bridge

09-06-2018Front Page
Two Men Die In Marinette County Crashes Monday

09-06-2018Front Page
Public Services Committee Airs Inmate Phone Call Costs

08-29-2018Front Page
Large Caravan Welcomes Wall That Heals To Crivitz

08-29-2018Front Page
Burmeister Approved As Highway Commissioner

08-29-2018Front Page
Crivitz School Holding Open Houses Aug. 30

08-29-2018Front Page
To Name New Chief Sept. 4

08-29-2018Front Page
Marinette County Fair Draws Record Crowds Despite Rain

08-29-2018Community - Coleman
Flag Burning at Coleman Sept. 4

08-29-2018Community - Coleman
Flag Burning at Coleman Sept. 4

08-29-2018Community - Coleman
Coleman HS Class of 1957 Reunion Sept. 14

08-29-2018Community - Coleman
Coleman 1952-58 Classes Reunion

08-29-2018Community - Coleman
Coleman Board To Meet Sept. 4

08-29-2018Community - Crivitz
Legion Labor Day Trap Shoot Sept. 1

08-29-2018Community - Crivitz
Benefit For Annette Bevier

08-29-2018Community - Crivitz
Book Sale at Crivitz Library

08-29-2018Community - Crivitz
Cornhole Benefit for Cancer Victim

08-29-2018Community - Pembine
Elderly Services Sign Up for Living Well

08-29-2018Community - Pembine
Amberg Historical Society Museum Opens Sept. 1, 3

08-29-2018Community - Pembine
Beecher Okays Liquor License for 4-Seasons

08-29-2018Community - Pembine
West Shore Museum Ice Cream Social Sept. 2

08-29-2018Community - Wausaukee
Silver Cliff ATV Victim Identified

08-29-2018Community - Wausaukee
Northwoods Auction Is Sunday, Sept. 2

08-29-2018Community - Wausaukee
Presbyterian Women List Coming Events

08-29-2018Community - Wausaukee
WHS Class of 1958 To Celebrate 60 Years

08-29-2018Perspectives
Country Cousin

08-29-2018Perspectives
From our readers

08-29-2018Perspectives
From My Window - Edgar Steam Show

08-29-2018Obituaries
Beverly Wagner

08-29-2018Obituaries
Marion E. Verbisky

08-29-2018Obituaries
Mary A. Slempkes


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841 Maple St
PO Box 187
Peshtigo, WI 54157
Phone: 715-582-4541
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