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THE CITY REBORN FROM THE ASHES OF AMERICA'S MOST DISASTROUS FOREST FIRE
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Country Cousin

Issue Date: March 3, 2022

In like a lamb...

March certainly has come in like a lamb this year. Really spring-like temperatures - actually above freezing - and only the balmiest of breezes. Sort of scary wondering what kind of lion we may need to contend with when it's time for the month to end.

Lent is here, and Easter is only 6 weeks ahead. Time to get our houses in order, both the spiritual ones with secrets perhaps hidden in the deepest recesses of our souls, and the real ones, where we need to chase dust bunnies out from under the beds, shine the windows and mirrors, wash the curtains, vacuum the furnace filters, and clear out cobwebs from the corners of the rooms.

SNOW BIRDS

Have always envied the folks that our friends down south identify as "snow birds." You know, the ones who fly away to more hospitable climes for the winter, and then return to Wisconsin after the snow melts.

Recently learned some of our feathered friends also are known as snowbirds. They fly south from Canada to spend their winters here in Wisconsin, and go home to Canada in spring. Don't think it's that much warmer here in winter than it is in Canada. Wonder why those birds don't keep traveling, once they've come this far, and get to where it is noticeably warmer?

Anyway, the real name of these snowbirds is Dark Eyed Junco.

They are somewhat round birds with pink bills, round, dark eyes, chest, head and back the color of soot, and white bellies. They usually collect in small flocks on the ground, and don"t seem very considerate of one another. The larger birds seem to pick on the smaller, weaker ones.

Know any humans like that?

SOLDIERS

All the news about fighting in Ukraine got me to thinking about military traditions. Learned a while back that soldiers do not march in step when going across bridges because they could set up a vibration which could be sufficient to knock the bridge down.

Also learned that the military salute is a motion that evolved from medieval times, when knights in armor raised their visors to reveal their identity.

HOW DID WE SURVIVE?

With all the talk today about safety and security, it's hard to believe any of my generation lived to adulthood. We did lots of things that are unthinkable today. Most of us did survive, and without scars to show for it, mental or physical. Maybe we were tougher back then? Or maybe kids are just as tough today, but we just don't give them a chance?

We children rode in cars with no seat belts or air bags. Riding in the back of a pickup truck on a warm day was a special treat. Once, I was allowed to ride all the way from Marinette to Crivitz in a bathtub on a trailer Dad was towing behind the car.

We had no childproof lids on medicine bottles, doors or cabinets, and when we rode our bikes or roller skated we had no helmets. My greatest joy from bike riding was the feel of wind blowing through my hair. We drank water from the garden hose and not from a bottle.

I thought I was supposed to accomplish something before I was allowed to be proud of myself.

In summer, we would leave home in the morning and play all day, as long as we were back when the street lights came on. No one was able to reach us all day. We usually showed up at home when we were hungry unless somebody else fed us. Mom knew that if something happened somebody would come and tell her.

"We played dodge ball and sometimes the ball would really hurt. Our games of "Take Away" were played all over the neighborhood, and sometimes got rougher than professional football.

We played with toy guns, sometimes even BB guns - cowboys and Indians, cops and robbers. If no toy guns were available we shot with our fingers or a stick.

In winter, we had real snowball fights, played king on the snow mountain, pulled our sleds to the tops of hills and rode them down, and loved making snow men and snow angels.

Speaking of outdoor winter fun, does anyone remember the name of the game where we made an outer ring in deep snow, then stomped down paths to the center, where there was a spot for whoever was "it". We played it in school and in the neighborhood, and the kids who were not "it" had to keep going round and round in the outer circle. I think if was "Fox and Geese," but not sure, and cannot remember the rest of the rules.

We ate cupcakes, bread and real butter, drank whole milk and sugar soda, but we were never overweight...We were always outside playing. Also, must admit, candy, ice cream and soda were rare treats reserved for special occasions, because for most every family I knew, money was an issue.

Little League had tryouts and not everyone made the team. Those who didn't had to handle the disappointment. Some students weren't as smart as others or didn't work hard so they failed a grade and were held back. They lived with it. Our generation produced some of the world's greatest risk takers and problem solvers. We had freedom, failure, success and responsibility, and we learned how to deal with it all.

Most of us would rather swim in the pond instead of a pristine pool. Baths were a weekly event.

The term "cell phone" would have conjured up a phone in a jail cell, and a pager was the school PA system. We all took gym, not "PE" and risked permanent injury with a pair of high top Ked's (only worn in the gym), instead of cross-training athletic shoes with air cushion soles and built in light reflectors. Flunking gym was not an option...even for stupid kids! I guess PE must be much harder than gym.

Every year, someone taught the whole school a lesson by running in the halls with leather soled shoes and hitting the wet spot. How much better off we would be today if we only knew we could have sued the school system.

I can't understand it. Schools didn't offer 14-year-olds an abortion or condoms or talk about "alternate life styles". We wouldn't have known what they were anyway. But they did give us a couple of baby aspirin and cough syrup if we started getting the sniffles. Our elementary school didn't have a nurse. Aspirins and goiter pills were dispensed by the teacher, and a youngster who got sick was sent home.

Speaking of school, we all said prayers...and the pledge. Staying in for detention after school caught all sorts of negative attention for about the next two weeks - from teachers, classmates and our parents. We must have had horribly damaged psyches.

I thought I was supposed to accomplish something before I was allowed to be proud of myself.

I can't recall being bored without computers, Play Station, Nintendo, X-box or 270 digital cable TV stations. We didn't even have TV until Junior High. There was radio with Tom Mix, Hop Along Cassidy, The Lone Ranger and The Shadow Knows.

Anyway, being bored was dangerous. Any kid who complained of boredom was very promptly given a job to do, and that job often wasn't much fun at all.

We played all over the neighborhood, often 'til well after dark, or we trekked out to the back 40. We climbed trees, swam in the river (unsupervised), swung into the water from a rope tied to a branch, built forts out of branches and old pieces of plywood, made trails, and fought over who got to be Roy Rogers and who had to be Dale Evans. After dark, all the kids played "One o'clock and the ghost ain't here," until we were called in for bed.

"We played "Kick the Can" all over the neighborhood and "King of the Hill" on piles of gravel left on vacant construction sites. When we got hurt Mom treated it with a mercurochrome and then we got our butt spanked if we had been breaking the rules or doing something really stupid. Usually we didn't report an injury unless it bled a lot. Then there might be a band-aid from a box that cost 49 cents. Now it's a trip to the emergency room, followed by a $49 bottle of antibiotics and then a call to the attorney to sue the contractor for leaving that vicious pile of gravel out where it could attract kids.

It wasn't physical abuse when we got a paddling, it was expected if we sassed the neighbors, picked on a smaller kid, or heaven forbid, talked back to Mom or Dad.

We walked to school, and the PTA movies downtown, and sometimes we took the bus to Hennes Park or to the theater in Menominee, all unaccompanied except by each other.

In winter, we hiked the mile or so to the skating rink, played crack the whip and other dangerous games, and then walked home in the dark.

How did we survive?

LAUNDRY

Recently read a tip that aspirin not only can put a headache to sleep, it supposedly can also help get stains, grey spots and yellow armpits out of your laundry, and get your white clothes whiter than white. According to a hack on the web, the only thing you need to make sure your laundry comes out perfectly white again is five aspirin tablets of 325 milligrams each.

First, sort out the stained white garments you need to treat. Next, put the five aspirin tablets in a large bowl or tub of hot water to let them dissolve. Stir this aspirin water until all of the tablets have completely dissolved. If you're in a hurry, crumble them up before putting them in the water. Next, place the dull, white clothes in the bowl or tub with the aspirin water and leave them to soak there for at least eight hours. Longer won't hurt. They say you can also just add a few aspirins to the washing machine, but the soaking method works better. After you've let the clothes soak, you still have to wash them in the washing machine like you normally would. Just dump them into the washing machine, aspirin water and all, with the rest of your white laundry and run through the normal cycle.

COOKIN' TIME

It's still time for warming foods, even for those who don't have a lot of time to cook it. Slow cookers are wonderful!

CUZ CREAMY ITALIAN GNOCCHI SOUP

Cook this luscious soup in your 6 or 8 quart crockpot on low for 6 hours or high for 3 to 4 hours. Gnocchi are little Italian dumplings made from potatoes. Find them in the freezer section, or on the regular grocery shelves with pasta products. If you prefer, substitute kale, collard greens, beet greens or mustard greens for the spinach. Am considering trying this with diced fish - possibly cod or walleye - instead of the chicken for a creamy meatless soup.

2 pounds boneless, skinless chicken breasts, diced

1 cup yellow onion, diced

1 cup celery, sliced (about two stalks)

3/4 cup shredded carrots

2 garlic cloves, minced

4 cups chicken broth

1 teaspoon ground thyme

1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg, optional

1 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon black pepper

16 ounces potato gnocchi, fresh, frozen or dried

2 cups heavy cream

1 tablespoon cornstarch

1 cup spinach, chopped

1 cup shredded Parmesan cheese, for serving

1 tablespoon freshly chopped parsley, for serving

Freshly ground nutmeg for garnish, optional

Cut the chicken into nice bite-size pieces and put them in the bottom of the slow cooker, followed by the diced onion, celery, carrots, garlic, thyme, nutmeg, salt and pepper. Pour the broth into the slow cooker and cover. Cook on low for 6 hours or on high for 3-4 hours. Turn the slow cooker to high, and add the gnocchi. If you use the frozen variety, let the soup heat for about 10 minutes. Then, in a small bowl, whisk together the heavy cream and cornstarch. Pour this mixture into the soup, stir well, and set the slow cooker to high to cook for another 20 to 30 minutes. About 10 minutes before you want to serve the soup, add the spinach. If you choose to use one of the other greens, you may want to add them when you add the gnocchi. Serve the soup hot with parmesan cheese, fresh parsley and the optional nutmeg for garnish. Wonderful with hot crusty garlic bread.

CAULIFLOWER NUGGETS

It's Lent, and lots of us are trying to avoid sweets, and refrain from eating meat more than once a day. Here is a deep fried treat that has nothing to do with either fish or meat, and it's so good even the kids will probably eat it.

Oil, as needed for frying

2 eggs

1 cups all-purpose flour

1 teaspoon garlic powder

1 teaspoons salt

teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Pinch of cayenne pepper

1 head cauliflower, divided into bite-size florets

BUFFALO SAUCE

6 tablespoons butter

1 cups buffalo-style hot sauce (such as Frank's)

cup chopped fresh parsley (optional)

Carrots and celery sticks, as needed for serving

Blue cheese dressing, as needed for serving

1. Wash and prepare the cauliflower. Let it drain thoroughly. Use a Fry Daddy or other deep fryer, or pour 2 to 3 inches of oil into a large sauté pan. Heat the oil over medium-high heat until it shimmers on the surface and reads about 350F on a thermometer. You can test the oil with a piece of cauliflower: If it bubbles and stays at the surface after you drop it in the oil, then you're good to go.

2. Line a baking sheet with a few layers of paper towels. Whisk the eggs in a large, shallow bowl.

3. In another large, shallow bowl, whisk the flour with the garlic powder, salt, black pepper and cayenne.

4. Working with a few pieces at a time, dip the cauliflower florets into the egg until they are well coated. Then dip them into the flour mixture and toss well to coat. Repeat with the remaining cauliflower.

5. Working in batches, fry the cauliflower until the pieces are evenly golden brown, 6 to 9 minutes. Remove the cauliflower with a slotted spoon and drain on the prepared paper-towel-lined baking sheet.

6. In a small pot, melt the butter over medium heat. Whisk in the buffalo sauce until well combined.

7. Add the fried cauliflower to the sauce and gently toss to coat. Garnish with parsley, if desired.

8. Serve the cauliflower immediately, hot, with the carrots and celery on the side and the blue cheese dressing for dipping.

BEAR TRACK COOKIE BARS

Consider making these for Easter treats, but maybe you should practice with a batch now to be sure they turn out right. Good excuse, right?

1-1/2 cups all-purpose flour

2/3 cup confectioners' sugar

1/3 cup baking cocoa

1/4 teaspoon salt

1 cup butter, melted

caramel layer:

1 package (13 ounces) caramels

3 tablespoons heavy whipping cream

1-1/2 cups lightly crushed pretzels

peanut butter layer:

1 cup creamy peanut butter

1/4 cup butter, softened

1/2 cup confectioners' sugar

chocolate layer:

2 cups semisweet chocolate chips

3 tablespoons shortening

Preheat oven to 350. Whisk flour, sugar, cocoa and salt; stir in butter. Press onto bottom of a greased . Bake until set, 10-15 minutes. Cool completely.?Microwave caramels and cream, covered, on high, stirring occasionally, until melted, 3-5 minutes. Spread over crust; cover with crushed pretzels. Refrigerate until set.?Meanwhile, combine peanut butter and butter; beat in confectioners' sugar until smooth. Spread over pretzels. Return to refrigerator. In the microwave, melt chocolate chips and shortening; stir until smooth. Spread over peanut butter layer. Refrigerate 15 minutes before cutting into bars.



Thought for the week: God promised us, "Ask and ye shall receive," and yet we so often fail to ask. Or instead of asking, we try to dictate. He always answers, but sometimes we don't like the answer. That said, if by turning the dial on a radio, or simply asking Alexa, we can hear songs played thousands of miles away, and by switching on the television set we can watch actors on stages on other continents, or even astronauts on the moon, then why should we ever doubt that God can hear our prayers?



(This column is written by Shirley Prudhomme of Crivitz. Views expressed are her own and are in no way intended to be an official statement of the opinions of Peshtigo Times editors and publishers. She may be contacted by phone at 715-927-5034 or by e-mail at shirleyprudhommechickadee@yahoo.com.)


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